PCOS and slim women

Why we all seem to carry it all around the waist...

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Postby Annoldie » Fri Sep 10, 2010 12:02 pm

Hi Emma. Wanting a baby is a very powerful feeling, but taking a few months to get your weight and diet right will help you to have a healthy baby and you will be fitter to look after it. Being underweight can give you very similar symptoms to pcos - such as absent periods and excess hair so it will be difficult to sort out which it is especially as it's not clear whether you have cysts or not and blood tests are not reliable. You have done very well to get your BMI up to 19 but what you eat also matters especially when you are planning to have a baby. The consultants who advise Verity are keen that a glucose tolerance test is done before prescribing Metformin to treat Insulin Resistance. Your consultant should be able to organize that for you. I think the main thing is to get some help with your nutrition. Hope this helps. Ann
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Postby Annoldie » Fri Sep 10, 2010 12:22 pm

Sorry I didn't answer your question about the frequency of meals The experts seem to agree that small frequent meals are the answer if you have IR - they help to keep your blood sugar level.
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Postby emmadenny » Fri Sep 10, 2010 1:45 pm

Thanks Ann,

There were cysts seen on my ovaries when an ultrasound was done. Consultant wants me to try the diet until 25th nov and then re evaluate- however he is basically saying cut right down on my fruit and veg intake and eat basically only protein- can this be right?! I'm 5th 7 and roughly now weigh between 8st 5 and 8st 7. Would your opinio be that this is too low? Thanks for being so helpful!
Emma
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Postby Annoldie » Fri Sep 10, 2010 3:19 pm

Well your BMI is just a guide really, you have to factor in your build, amount of muscle and what your family are like, how much exercise you get etc. The comments I made are based on the point you made that you have just got up to a bmi of 19, so I am assuming that you have recently been lower than 19 and your body has still some catching up to do. I think 20 is seen as normal. Your limited diet would concern me more than your weight as it is now. I am not a doctor or a dietitian but a diet consisting largely of protein and virtually no carbohyrate doesn't sound good to me - I would want a second opinion from a nutritionist/ dietition.
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Postby emmadenny » Fri Sep 10, 2010 5:02 pm

This is exactly how I feel about his advice and am now wondering if I should seek a second opinion or go and see my gp, as I do not believe that telling someone to consume v minimal fruit and veg and just large amounts of protein can be seen as healthy?! Also my periods have been absent for at least 5 years; surely simply doing this will not be enough to br g on periods and ovulation?!

Emma
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Postby Annoldie » Fri Sep 10, 2010 9:42 pm

Emma, if you really have not had a period for 5yrs either naturally or medically induced that is not good. It's important to have periods at least every 3 or 4 months to keep your uterus healthy. I think your doctors should be giving you medication to make sure this happens now that your weight has improved. As you probably know, having periods does not necessarily mean that you are ovulating so you may need treatment for that too. Ann
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Postby KT_3 » Mon Oct 11, 2010 12:51 pm

After joining only yesterday, it's really nice to have found this thread. I'm just under 9 stone, completely in the 'normal' band for my BMI, and all I ever read is how PCOS is related to weight. I know we're lucky in many ways not to have the weight issue, but it can be so frustrating when that is the only advice!

I've been on the pill since I was diagnosed 8 years ago and recently came off after deciding this was only masking the problem, but I've not been to see my GP since coming off. I don't have any symptoms other than irregular cycles - generally between 5 and 8 weeks long. I'm trying to keep to a low carb diet in the interests of my insulin level - but is insulin a factor for slim women? I'm just not sure. All I'm ever told by my GP is to go on the pill. I'm basically trying to be as healthy as possible to see what happens. My periods aren't as irregular as they were when I was first diagnosed, I wonder if maybe my hormone balance is better now I'm a bit older?
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Postby coatesy79 » Wed Dec 15, 2010 8:47 pm

Emma

Not sure if you are still on this forum but just to let you know i too have been diagnosed with insulin resistance. I am just under 8 and a half stone so do not have a weight or "hair" issue! have seen a consultant who also told me to stick to 3 or possible 4 meals a day and to NOT snack in between. He said to have protein with every meal and cut down on carbs. He said the most important meal was breakfast and to eat mainly protein (eggs, smoked salmon, bacon etc). I am due to go back to see him again in February when he will give me another scan to see if things are progressing (i had lots of small cysts around my ovaries, though my ovaries are a normal size).
I have found very little info online about the no snacking part as so many places say to eat little and often, but my consultant (and nurse who has pcos) say it's very important not to snakc.

Hope this helps xx
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